Trafigura linked to oil stolen from South Sudan (and other scandals)

The Zambian government has asked the public to provide information on how dirty one of the oil companies is dealing with is. Here are some of the scandals Trafigura is involved in on the international scene

Trafigura linked to oil ‘looted’ from South Sudan

Commodities trader has bought containers of crude Sudan seized from its southern neighbour, industry insiders say. The Guardian of UK (Wednesday 8 February 2012) The Swiss-based commodities trader Trafigura has bought oil the South Sudanese government claims was seized by Sudan, its northern neighbour and former civil war enemy, according to industry sources. Trafigura is now in a legal dispute over ownership, the sources told Reuters. The tanker of crude oil is one of three seized cargoes, forming part of some $815m (£512m) in oil revenues, which South Sudan‘s president, Salva Kiir, accused Sudan of “looting”; the Sudanese government, in Khartoum, said the cargoes provided compensation for unpaid transit fees. Trafigura is now in a legal dispute over ownership, the sources told Reuters. The tanker of crude oil is one of three seized cargoes, forming part of some $815m (£512m) in oil revenues, which South Sudan‘s president, Salva Kiir, accused Sudan of “looting”; the Sudanese government, in Khartoum, said the cargoes provided compensation for unpaid transit fees. Landlocked South Sudan must pump its oil to the Red Sea via a pipeline across Sudan, to Port Sudan, to earn oil revenues, which account for 98% of the seven-month-old country’s income. Original story here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/feb/08/trafigura-oil-south-sudanN

Trafigura fined €1m for exporting toxic waste to Africa

The oil trader Trafigura has been fined ¤1m (£840,000) for illegally exporting tonnes of hazardous waste to west Africa. It is the first time the London-based firm has been convicted of criminal charges over the environmental scandal, in which 30,000 Africans were made ill when the toxic waste was dumped in Ivory Coast. A court in the Netherlandsalso ruled today that the firm had concealed the dangerous nature of the waste when it was initially unloaded from a ship in Amsterdam. Eliance Kouassi, president of the victims’ group in Ivory Coast, said: “Finally Trafigura has been called out in a court of law. It’s a real victory for us.” The fine is, however, only half the amount sought by the Dutch prosecutors. Amsterdam district court judge Frans Bauduin also convicted a Trafigura employee and the Ukranian captain of the ship that carried the waste for their roles in the 2006 scandal. Full story:http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jul/23/trafigura-dutch-fine-waste-export

Oxford university students reject dirt money from Trafigura

Students and academics at Oxford are angry that their university has accepted more than £3m from a foundation established by a founder of the controversial oil trading company Trafigura. Graham Sharp was one of the three co-founders of the company, which on Friday was fined £840,000 by a court in the Netherlands for illegally exporting tonnes of toxic waste to west Africa. Sharp, who graduated from St John’s College, Oxford, in 1983, with a first-class honours degree in engineering, economics and management, retired from Trafigura’s operational business in 2007. He went on to found the Helsington Foundation, a Liechtenstein-based trust that has given £3.25m to fund a new summer school at the University of Oxford that will aim to help pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

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